About the foundation

FAST is a non profit Foundation legally established in Argentina under the IGJ number 1.810.279. The foundation develops its activities across the country and seeks to promote the use of the Smalltalk programming language and technology in all fields including education (primary, secondary, and tertiary), scientific information technology research, and software industry. To that effect, the foundation organizes three annual activities that engage international specialists in each of the three areas. These activities consist in the SqueakFest education conference, Pre-Smalltalks workshops, and the Smalltalks conference. The three events are completely free and provide a unique opportunity for showing advances and new projects of the global Smalltalk community. Furthermore, these activities allow young developers to acquire experience in presenting their work in English before an international audience.

Our Mision

Promote the use of Smalltalk in all areas regarding education, scientific research and professional development, connecting Argentina and the region with the international Smalltalk community.

OUR TARGET

FAST aims at reaching primary, secondary and university educators, software developers from both the Open Source community
and the Software Industry and Scientific Researchers.

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WHAT WE DO

The foundation achieves these goals with a multi-faceted approach. Since the integration of various Smalltalk teams is essential,
FAST organizes the Smalltalks conference each year. The foundation and its sponsors strongly supports the community by providing travel arrangements
for the audience, inviting internationally recognized speakers, and taking care of the event’s costs so that the conference is free.
The foundation also supports Smalltalk community members in their endeavors.

Free conferences

Since the integration of various Smalltalk teams is essential, FAST organizes the Smalltalks conference each year. The Foundation and its sponsors strongly supports the community by providing travel arrangements for the audience, inviting internationally recognized speakers, and taking care of the event's costs so the conference is free. FAST also supports Smalltalk community members in their endeavors.

Publications

Every year, we generate a report of all the activities organized by FAST. Additionally, if the research session is organized during Smalltalks conference, we publish also the proceedings corresponding to the research articles participating in the research session. We must remark that the publications submitted to that session are evaluated by three reviewers, whose opinion is considered to decide if the publication is accepted or not in the research session of the conference.

Financial help

Every year FAST provides financial assistance inviting foreign personalities with ample trajectories and to young researchers that continue the Smalltalk tradition of technological innovation.

Videos

The Foundation publishes videos taken at the conferences, as well as other material of interest to the Smalltalk community. FAST’s YouTube channel is here: https://www.youtube.com/user/FASTFoundation

We are smalltalkers and we love it

Smalltalk was designed in the 1970s at Xerox PARC, where a significant fraction of today’s computer world originated.
Besides Smalltalk, PARC’s inventions at that time include the laser printer,PostScript, Ethernet, the foundations of TCP/IP, GUIs, and WYSIWYG text editing.
And back in 1968, Smalltalk’s principal architect envisioned the idea that computing should be personal.

COLLABORATE

It is easy to take these inventions and ideas for granted today. Yet, in doing so, their current state appears to us as an end, rather than a step towards a better future. This present acts as a somewhat comfortable prison, effectively preventing us from achieving the next qualitative jump. The result is that we continue to live in a world of ideas that is about 50 years old.

More polished versions of the present do not come from the future. Thus, an incremental improvement approach to things will not help us bring about the true computer revolution.

The process that created Smalltalk with the rest of our current world began by looking at the finest examples of prior art. Today, Smalltalk is an exceptional bit of prior art. Even more interestingly, it is also current and relevant — many other languages and projects take inspiration in its values today.

But how should Smalltalk evolve, going beyond mere accumulation of features? Answers to these questions are likely not to be found in today’s world of stark contrasts: software and hardware systems critical to our society yet effectively unintelligible, and “apps” that trivialize computers’ potential. Instead, we believe close contact with the mindset and culture of those that created our environment, not just their imitators, is critical so that we can invent our own our future.